Karate - Budo  
  The key features and principles for understanding karate  
 

karaté

 
   
  >> Stage karaté Vincenzo Figuccio 19-21 mai - Belgique english français
Contents
Karate and emptiness
 
  Introduction
  History
  Styles of karate
  Aims of karate
  Kihon, kata, kumite
  Physical principes
  Bunkai
  Combat
  Aggression and stress
  Kumite in pratice
  Dangerous spots
  Japan, Buddhism & Zen
  Karate and emptiness
  Precepts
  Quotations
  Conclusions
  References
  Author
  Contact
  The book
   
Annexes
    JKA
    Shotokan kata
    Shitoryu kata
    Goju-ryu kata
    Kumite
    Takedown & MMA
    Physical training
    Links

 

 

Emptiness in the Buddhist sense is undoubtedly the essential link between karate and Zen. Here are some reflections and ideas about this notion of emptiness.

 

Mu

Mu means “nothingness”, an idea that is linked to emptiness (Ku/kara). In Zen philosophy, nothingness is considered to be the origin of all things, in the same way that everything is possible when there is a blank page.

 

Quote from Gichin Funakoshi:

“Just as the smooth surface of a mirror reflects what is before it,
And just as a quiet valley echoes a sound,
So the karateka must achieve inner emptiness (banishing selfishness and malice) so that he can act appropriately to everything that might appear before him.

This is what is meant by kara or emptiness in karate”.

 

Quote from Nakayama Masatoshi:

Karate-do is a martial art using bare hands that is practised in a state of inner emptiness and stillness of the mind”.